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Monday, 28 May 2012 10:24

HP stamps on fleeing Autonomy rats

Written by Nick Farell

hp logo new

Rather have a full bottle in front of me

The maker of jolly expensive printer ink, HP, is having a problem with fleeing staff. Autonomy founder Mike Lynch join a long line of top managers to leave the software maker since HP bought it last year.

Apparently HP CEO Meg Whitman has had the challenging task of going on a charm offensive. She has told Autonomy staff they have a bright future with HP.

The company bought Autonomy for more than $11 billion as part of a daft move by the then CEO Leo Apothiker to turn HP into SAP. However Autonomy did rather badly last quarter and was to blame for a disappointing performance of HP's software division.

Whitman said in an email that it was "always hard when a charismatic founder, who has built a great company leaves." But she added that Autonomy staff had a "very bright future" aft HP. She stressed that Lynch's departure was down to the division's poor performance rather than the notion that Autonomy had no place in HP's corporate culture.

Already one in five Automony people think that the the writing is on the wall and have cleaned out their desk and moved on to greener pastures. Lynch will be replaced by HP's chief strategy officer Bill Veghte.

World on the street is that perhaps things had not gone so well at integrating Automony and Lynch took the fall for it. HP had not done well with its software, not just around Autonomy but in other sides of its software suite as well.

The problem is that HP does things one way while Autonomy did them another. Interestingly enoguh, Autonomy never fell short on its sales targets until it was bought by HP.


Nick Farell

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